Published on July 18th, 2012 | by Destinee

Yugoslavian M57 – I Can Field Strip it Blindfolded

I’ll admit it , I’m a nerd. I’ve always had a fondness for history.

What most interests me is European and American history during WWII and the beginning of the Cold War, especially the racing evolution of the time period’s military technology. This era saw the development of mechanized warfare, jet engines, machine guns, and even the atomic bomb.

My fascination for the technological advancement of this time surely contributes to my affinity for the 1911 pistol. The grip angle suits me well, and I enjoy shooting .45 ACP, but I also love the history associated with the firearm (and with three quarters of a century in the service of the U.S. military, there is a lot of it).

However, the Communist bloc weapons of the era hold the same degree of intrigue for me – so much so that I’ve done a fair amount of reading on the subject. The Tokarev pistol, to me, represents a crossover from the western to the eastern European small arms. Its feel and function echo that of a 1911. It borrows some design cues from the American staple, but its prominence and use in Eastern Europe have given the Tokarev its own long legacy.

The Yugoslav M57

The Yugoslavian M57

The TT-30 (Tula Tokarev) was designed in 1930 by Fedor Tokarev in 1930 to replace the Soviet Service revolver, the M1895 Nagant. As it was put into service in the USSR, the design was improved and re-released in 1933 as the TT-33.

The Tokarev takes several form and function elements from Browning semi auto handguns of the time. The externals mirror Browning’s slim Model 1903 and uses the short recoil operation of the M1911.

However, despite the similarities between the 1911 and TT function, the Tokarev has several unique design elements that separate it from 1911 clones. Some of them made the TT-33 easier to manufacture, like the full circumference locking lugs on the barrel and the captured recoil spring.

Another of the differences between Browning’s 1911 and Tokarev’s TT is the choice of caliber. The M1911 is chambered in .45 ACP, while the TT uses the hot 7.62x25mm Tokarev cartridge (based off of the 7.63x25mm Mauser round).

One of the most important deviations from the Browning 1911 internals lies in the hammer and sear components. The TT-33 features a modular hammer and sear unit that is simple enough to allow for easy replacement, even in the field of battle. The simplicity of manufacture and maintenance, as well as the stout design are two reasons that the Tokarev is known for its reliability.

The success of the TT style encouraged a wide number of variants on the original TT-30 model, namely the Yugoslavian M57.

The Yugoslavian M57 was produced by Crevna Zastava (which became Zastava Arms in what is now Serbia) and issued as the official sidearm of the Yugoslavian Army in 1957.

The M57 is a Tokarev clone with two notable differences. First, the M57 utilizes a full length articulated guide rod (with a captured recoil spring). The second distinctive design departure is that Zastava extended the grip and magazine to increase the capacity to 9 rounds from the TT-33′s 8.

Zastava Arms still produces model M57s, but to import them into the US, they have been re-tooled to include a 1911 style thumb safety. There are a couple of smaller cosmetic differences (such as the M57′s larger mag release button), but the overall fit and finish, as well as general operation of the two pistols, are largely identical. With the modular firing mechanism and captured recoil spring, it is a breeze to disassemble and reassemble. In fact, I can do it with my eyes closed (check the video below for proof).

My penchant for handguns with history has given me an appreciation for the Tokarev model. However, its elegant look, simplistic design, and ability to withstand abuse all win it points aside from its prominence during World War II and the beginning of the Cold War.

That isn’t to suggest that the Tokarev design is the most remarkable military technology developed during that epoch. But, the small steps toward producing a more effective sidearm have greater implications when the force utilizing the improved technology is as massive as that of the Red Army.

That degree of historical significance is just enough to pique the interest of a gun history nerd like me.

Destinee and the Yugoslav M57

Destinee and the Yugoslav M57



14 comments
powerup
powerup

Hi  where can one get a new  57  thanks

JoeFabeetz
JoeFabeetz

By the way, I still don't understand how you find time to do all this stuff.

JoeFabeetz
JoeFabeetz

Interesting article.  You seem to have an amazing ability to retain information about just about everything. 

Next, do a review of the FN1900.  I own one and I love shooting it.  It's got an unique design in that the barrel is located below the recoil spring thus minimizing recoil.

GoNavy
GoNavy

Great job Destinee on the Tokarev. Also I enjoyed your 3 part music video as well. Keep up the great work. Sorry you didn't win the AR contest that Emboey had. I was excited you were on the top 10. Maybe you will get an AR one of these days and do a review?

FateofDestinee
FateofDestinee

 @GoNavy Thanks much! I'm more than happy someone else won the AR. I just wanted to have fun and support Eric's cause. While I had a blast making the vid, I don't think it fulfilled the requirements for the VR entries (I didn't explain why I ought to get the AR). So, it's more fair that way. :] I do plan to add an AR to my little "arsenal" sometime soon, but I want to build it myself. I'm stubborn like that.

Ullr
Ullr

I don't remember seeing a Tokarev TT with a manual safety before.  Did the Serbs add that on the M57?

FateofDestinee
FateofDestinee

 @Ullr Yep, the safety was added to be able to import to the States. I've seen pics of M57s without them. The mechanism is very simple, and not always effective. This is not a pistol I'd carry cocked and locked...

CJCJ
CJCJ

Nice job.

 

I also enjoyed your previous write ups on knife steel, and the Benchmade Adamus.

 

Bought two of the Adamus and love 'em.

FateofDestinee
FateofDestinee

 @CJCJ Thanks much :D Glad you enjoyed those. Which versions of the Adamas do you have? I only have the 275... but I'd like to check out the 375. The ridge on the back of the fixed blade looks badass, if nothing else. lol

CJCJ
CJCJ

 @FateofDestinee 

 

Got the Benchmade 2750 Adamas Automatic Knife partially serrated with MOLLE® Pouch from BladeHQ. Big, beefy, and designed for punishment.

 

http://www.bladehq.com/item--Benchmade-2750-Adamas-Automatic--11300

 

I'll have to check out the 375. I don't know if it's possible to have too many toys as long as they're high quality. The badass look is definitely a plus.

 

 

FateofDestinee
FateofDestinee like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @CJCJ It's a hardy blade, to be certain. I'm of the opinion you can never have to many... but maybe I just like to justify buying new toys :p heheh

HugeFan
HugeFan like.author.displayName 1 Like

Excellent history on this pistol. I knew very little other than it existed so thanks for the lesson! Pretty cool demo as well, like the choice of blindfolds. Oh and nice glam shot to cap it off, very L.A. Noire! :-P

FateofDestinee
FateofDestinee like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @HugeFan My pleasure haha I love history... I was a history major my first year of college. I had a lot of fun with writing this article (as you probably guessed). Glad you liked it :] Thanks! Oh man, I love that game ;D The ending made me so mad, though!

Back to Top ↑

  • Hot Video of the Day

  • Recent Posts

  • Find Us on Facebook

  • Latest Job Opportunities
    See All Job Posts

    Hire Highly-Skilled
    Military Professionals

    Post Your Jobs Today



The Force12 Media Network