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Published on March 9th, 2012 | by Juliet One

21

Thunder Beast Arms Corporation 30P-1

There is a trend in the precision marksmanship community that has a large growing interest. The trend that I am going to discuss is suppressors, or more commonly known as “silencers “or “Cans”. Suppressors have been around since the beginning of the 20th century. For nearly 100 years, suppressors have been more of an uncommon item for a civilian marksman to own.  Thanks to the war on terrorism, many companies have brought some great products to market in hopes of providing our military units with their product. Like many great products that have been developed for our military, those products have also bled over to the civilian market. The suppressor is no different.

There are many different brands of suppressors on the market today. Many are built around different types of weapon systems for a specific purpose in mind. The suppressor that I will be highlighting today is built to suit the needs of the precision rifle. Now the precision rifle is a unique and very specialized weapon. For a rifle to be considered a precision rifle it must meet certain criteria. The main criteria that must be met falls under the accuracy standards. A precision rifle should be capable of shooting a 1 minute of angle “MOA” multiple shot group or under at 100yds. That equates to a 1 inch multiple shot group at 100yds.  Today, precision rifles are built to extremely high standards, and most of them perform far better than 1 MOA. Many reach .25 MOA or better.

There are many benefits of adding a suppressor to a precision rifle other than the pure benefit of sound suppression. The shooter must take into account what suppressor he will be utilizing because some will change the way the rifle performs. Many suppressors will change the point of impact “POI” of the round when added to the rifle.  Certain suppressors will also compromise the rifles accuracy.  These two factors alone can cause many problems for the precision shooter the main one being a miss of the target. For the civilian shooter that can cause dropped points on the score card but for the military sniper than can mean loss of life on the battlefield.

I have had the privilege to get behind many suppressed weapons in my career. There is one suppressor that has stood out to me that I would like to talk about. I am currently running a Short Action Customs “SAC” 6.5 Creedmoor built on a Remington 700 action.  The Suppressor that I have outfitted it with is the Thunder Beast Arms Corp “TBAC” 30P-1. This suppressor not only provides me with sound suppression but also adds velocity to my round with  zero POI shift at 100yds. Now many have probably heard in the past that suppressors slow the round down. I can assure you that couldn’t be farther from the truth. When I fire my rifle without a suppressor, my rounds clock in at 2850 feet per second “FPS”on average. By simply adding the TBAC 30P-1 my rounds clock in at 2880 FPS on average. The reason this happens is because of phenomenon known as “Free Bore Boost”. By adding the 30P-1 it extends the length of the barrel which gives the propellant more time to burn, which subsequently increases the velocity of the projectile. Now that benefits me because the bullet drops less over an extended distance which allows me more room for error in unknown distance situations. The bullet also travels through the different wind conditions faster, not allowing them to affect the projectile as much. That all adds up to more hits on target, more bad guys down and more good guys around to fight another day.

The TBAC 30P-1 also aids in recoil. One of the biggest problems that I found myself in on the competition scene is not knowing where my round had impacted due to the recoil of the rifle pushing my sights off target. Subsequently, I was unable to correct my sight adjustments in the proper manner. When I was in the Marine Corps I had the benefit of having a dedicated spotter to observe my rounds as they flew through the air and onto or off of target. As a civilian competitor I no longer have that luxury. Today when I’m engaging targets I have to rely on my own ability to spot my rounds on or off target. Before I began shooting with a suppressor I found it difficult sometimes to see my impacts due to recoil. By adding the 30P-1 I know longer have that problem. The 30P-1 mitigates recoil to the point that at longer distances I can actually see my own bullets vapor trail at times. This all adds up to me being able to correct my sight adjustments and put more rounds on target faster and with more precision.

The final benefits the 30P-1 offers is the ability to shoot with less or no hearing protection and with less signature. This is extremely important to the law enforcement or military sniper. By having this ability the snipers can communicate with their spotter, teammates and command elements more efficiently and have a better picture of battlefield. In low light conditions the 30P-1 virtually eliminates muzzle flash. This is important because muzzle flash will temporarily blind the shooter causing them to be out of the fight and unable to engage hostile targets which could cause loss of innocent lives. I would also add for the law enforcement community there is an added benefit of less liability to the civilian public due to hearing damage.

There are many suppressor manufacturers that offer great solutions. I am just introducing you to one product that I believe is at the top of the ranks. I would recommend the 30P-1 to any precision shooter looking for a suppressor that won’t kill you in the pocket book and also provides top of the line performance.

Specifications

Caliber .30 caliber, up to .300 Winchester Magnum
Material Titanium
Length 9 inches.
Diameter 1.5 inches.
Weight 16 ounces (varies with thread pattern)
Threads 5/8-24 standard, also M18x1.5, M18x1.0
Finish Black CeraKote; OD Green or FDE available
Use Precision/Long-range rifle, bolt or semi-auto
Price $1095

Happy Hunting

Juliet 1



24 comments
TBloxham
TBloxham

I love my TBA suppressors. I have the 30-P1 and the 223-P1 and I have never had to re-zero either of my rifles with them.  I am also a dealer for Thunder Beast Arms, their cans pretty much sell themselves. I have sold more TBA cans than any other brand.  When I spring for a .338 LM it will most definitely have a TBA on it.

oletimer
oletimer

Great replys, thanks, I am sure I will never shoot the high volume that most people use suppressors for so soaking it in a good powder remover will probably work fine for me. The gemtech is one that I have priced locally and it's 40% lower in cost than the 30p-1 suggested price. I think the gemtech can be taken apart so the mfg cost would be higher. I will have to check out the local suppliers on the cost of the 30p-1. Thanks

oletimer
oletimer

Great replys, thanks, I am sure I will never shoot the high volume that most people use suppressors for so soaking it in a good powder remover will probably work fine for me. The gemtech is one that I have priced locally and it's 40% lower in cost than the 30p-1 suggested price. I think the gemtech can be taken apart so the mfg cost would be higher. I will have to check out the local suppliers on the cost of the 30p-1. Thanks

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

This is in regards to Oletimer's questions The 30p-1 is cleanable although it's not necessary. If a shooter wants to clean a fully welded suppressor I would recommend a sonic cleaner. This is the same method many reloaders use for there brass prep. The 30p-1 cannot be taken apart and there is a good reason for it. When you have movable parts such as removable baffles, threaded caps, etc. you run into problems with consistency. When parts are removed and put back together they could be altered slightly in different positions. Inconsistency in precision marksmanship adds up to inconsistent hits on target or misses. The 30P-1 is built like this to ensure long term accuracy and reliability. I have fired thousands of rounds through my 30P-1 and I have never found a need to clean it. 

 

As far as finish is concerned the 30P-1 is finished in Cerakote. Cerakote is an extremely durable finish that resists heat and  the abuse that any sniper or competitive shooter will put his weapon through. I could write an entire article on Cerakote so I will keep this brief and provide you with a link to their website. www.cerakoteguncoatings.com. I personally wouldn't want any other coating but Cerakote on my weapons because of the abuse that it will resist. I highly recommend their product.

 

The 30P-1 is extremly effective at sound reduction. In many cases it is superior than most precision rifle suppressors on the market. Here are the results of  decible testing  that was done recently regarding three precision rifle suppressors. I have plans to perform some more testing on different suppressors in the future. If you all would like to see a product tested feel free to ask me and I will do my best to provide you with the information.

 

Sound meter numbers for the Thunderbeast 30P-1

 140+ for the first shot

 134.7

 134.6

 134.9

 

Sound meter numbers for the Shark Suppressor

140+ for the first shot 

136.2

137.0

136.0

 

Sound meter numbers for the Gemtech Sandstorm

140+ for the first round 

134.4

137.6

136.0

 

When it comes to using a 30 caliber suppressor on a 223 the answer is yes. It will suppress the sound but it will not be as quiet as a dedicated 223 suppressor. It is still very effective in my opinion. 

 

Thanks for the questions I hope they were helpful.

 

Juliet 1

 

FormerSFMedic
FormerSFMedic moderator like.author.displayName 1 Like

@Juliet 1 - I just wanted to add...... I've been fortunate enough to test a lot of suppressors on the market under various circumstances and environments. One thing that me and my fellow precision shooters have tested over the years is the effects on using a single suppressor for multiple calibers. When it comes to using a .30 cal suppressor with .223 ammo, we found that the .223 is actually quieter than the .30 cal ammo. There is more volume in the .30 cal suppressor than there is in a .223 suppressor. Therefore, we found performance to be the same or better than a dedicated suppressor for that caliber. The same held true when using .30 cal in .338 suppressors as well.

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

@FormerSFMedic, I appreciate your input. I am going to work on getting a test together sowe can get some hard numbers for our viewers. Thanks again

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

This is in regards to Oletimer's questions The 30p-1 is cleanable although it's not necessary. If a shooter wants to clean a fully welded suppressor I would recommend a sonic cleaner. This is the same method many reloaders use for there brass prep. The 30p-1 cannot be taken apart and there is a good reason for it. When you have movable parts such as removable baffles, threaded caps, etc. you run into problems with consistency. When parts are removed and put back together they could be altered slightly in different positions. Inconsistency in precision marksmanship adds up to inconsistent hits on target or misses. The 30P-1 is built like this to ensure long term accuracy and reliability. I have fired thousands of rounds through my 30P-1 and I have never found a need to clean it.    As far as finish is concerned the 30P-1 is finished in Cerakote. Cerakote is an extremely durable finish that resists heat and  the abuse that any sniper or competitive shooter will put his weapon through. I could write an entire article on Cerakote so I will keep this brief and provide you with a link to their website. www.cerakoteguncoatings.com. I personally wouldn't want any other coating but Cerakote on my weapons because of the abuse that it will resist. I highly recommend their product.   The 30P-1 is extremly effective at sound reduction. In many cases it is superior than most precision rifle suppressors on the market. Here are the results of  decible testing  that was done recently regarding three precision rifle suppressors. I have plans to perform some more testing on different suppressors in the future. If you all would like to see a product tested feel free to ask me and I will do my best to provide you with the information.   Sound meter numbers for the Thunderbeast 30P-1  140+ for the first shot  134.7  134.6  134.9   Sound meter numbers for the Shark Suppressor 140+ for the first shot  136.2 137.0 136.0   Sound meter numbers for the Gemtech Sandstorm 140+ for the first round  134.4 137.6 136.0   When it comes to using a 30 caliber suppressor on a 223 the answer is yes. It will suppress the sound but it will not be as quiet as a dedicated 223 suppressor. It is still very effective in my opinion.    Thanks for the questions I hope they were helpful.   Juliet 1  

FormerSFMedic
FormerSFMedic

@Juliet 1 - I just wanted to add...... I've been fortunate enough to test a lot of suppressors on the market under various circumstances and environments. One thing that me and my fellow precision shooters have tested over the years is the effects on using a single suppressor for multiple calibers. When it comes to using a .30 cal suppressor with .223 ammo, we found that the .223 is actually quieter than the .30 cal ammo. There is more volume in the .30 cal suppressor than there is in a .223 suppressor. Therefore, we found performance to be the same or better than a dedicated suppressor for that caliber. The same held true when using .30 cal in .338 suppressors as well.

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

@FormerSFMedic, I appreciate your input. I am going to work on getting a test together sowe can get some hard numbers for our viewers. Thanks again

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

This is in regards to Oletimer's questions The 30p-1 is cleanable although it's not necessary. If a shooter wants to clean a fully welded suppressor I would recommend a sonic cleaner. This is the same method many reloaders use for there brass prep. The 30p-1 cannot be taken apart and there is a good reason for it. When you have movable parts such as removable baffles, threaded caps, etc. you run into problems with consistency. When parts are removed and put back together they could be altered slightly in different positions. Inconsistency in precision marksmanship adds up to inconsistent hits on target or misses. The 30P-1 is built like this to ensure long term accuracy and reliability. I have fired thousands of rounds through my 30P-1 and I have never found a need to clean it.    As far as finish is concerned the 30P-1 is finished in Cerakote. Cerakote is an extremely durable finish that resists heat and  the abuse that any sniper or competitive shooter will put his weapon through. I could write an entire article on Cerakote so I will keep this brief and provide you with a link to their website. www.cerakoteguncoatings.com. I personally wouldn't want any other coating but Cerakote on my weapons because of the abuse that it will resist. I highly recommend their product.   The 30P-1 is extremly effective at sound reduction. In many cases it is superior than most precision rifle suppressors on the market. Here are the results of  decible testing  that was done recently regarding three precision rifle suppressors. I have plans to perform some more testing on different suppressors in the future. If you all would like to see a product tested feel free to ask me and I will do my best to provide you with the information.   Sound meter numbers for the Thunderbeast 30P-1  140+ for the first shot  134.7  134.6  134.9   Sound meter numbers for the Shark Suppressor 140+ for the first shot  136.2 137.0 136.0   Sound meter numbers for the Gemtech Sandstorm 140+ for the first round  134.4 137.6 136.0   When it comes to using a 30 caliber suppressor on a 223 the answer is yes. It will suppress the sound but it will not be as quiet as a dedicated 223 suppressor. It is still very effective in my opinion.    Thanks for the questions I hope they were helpful.   Juliet 1 Read more: http://loadoutroom.com/188/thunder-beast-arms-corporation-30p-1/#ixzz1orP9DgP8  

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

This is in regards to Oletimer's questions The 30p-1 is cleanable although it's not necessary. If a shooter wants to clean a fully welded suppressor I would recommend a sonic cleaner. This is the same method many reloaders use for there brass prep. The 30p-1 cannot be taken apart and there is a good reason for it. When you have movable parts such as removable baffles, threaded caps, etc. you run into problems with consistency. When parts are removed and put back together they could be altered slightly in different positions. Inconsistency in precision marksmanship adds up to inconsistent hits on target or misses. The 30P-1 is built like this to ensure long term accuracy and reliability. I have fired thousands of rounds through my 30P-1 and I have never found a need to clean it.    As far as finish is concerned the 30P-1 is finished in Cerakote. Cerakote is an extremely durable finish that resists heat and  the abuse that any sniper or competitive shooter will put his weapon through. I could write an entire article on Cerakote so I will keep this brief and provide you with a link to their website. www.cerakoteguncoatings.com. I personally wouldn't want any other coating but Cerakote on my weapons because of the abuse that it will resist. I highly recommend their product.   The 30P-1 is extremly effective at sound reduction. In many cases it is superior than most precision rifle suppressors on the market. Here are the results of  decible testing  that was done recently regarding three precision rifle suppressors. I have plans to perform some more testing on different suppressors in the future. If you all would like to see a product tested feel free to ask me and I will do my best to provide you with the information.   Sound meter numbers for the Thunderbeast 30P-1  140+ for the first shot  134.7  134.6  134.9   Sound meter numbers for the Shark Suppressor 140+ for the first shot  136.2 137.0 136.0   Sound meter numbers for the Gemtech Sandstorm 140+ for the first round  134.4 137.6 136.0   When it comes to using a 30 caliber suppressor on a 223 the answer is yes. It will suppress the sound but it will not be as quiet as a dedicated 223 suppressor. It is still very effective in my opinion.    Thanks for the questions I hope they were helpful.   Juliet 1  

Juliet 1
Juliet 1

This is in regards to Oletimer's questions The 30p-1 is cleanable although it's not necessary. If a shooter wants to clean a fully welded suppressor I would recommend a sonic cleaner. This is the same method many reloaders use for there brass prep. The 30p-1 cannot be taken apart and there is a good reason for it. When you have movable parts such as removable baffles, threaded caps, etc. you run into problems with consistency. When parts are removed and put back together they could be altered slightly in different positions. Inconsistency in precision marksmanship adds up to inconsistent hits on target or misses. The 30P-1 is built like this to ensure long term accuracy and reliability. I have fired thousands of rounds through my 30P-1 and I have never found a need to clean it.    As far as finish is concerned the 30P-1 is finished in Cerakote. Cerakote is an extremely durable finish that resists heat and  the abuse that any sniper or competitive shooter will put his weapon through. I could write an entire article on Cerakote so I will keep this brief and provide you with a link to their website. www.cerakoteguncoatings.com. I personally wouldn't want any other coating but Cerakote on my weapons because of the abuse that it will resist. I highly recommend their product.   The 30P-1 is extremly effective at sound reduction. In many cases it is superior than most precision rifle suppressors on the market. Here are the results of  decible testing  that was done recently regarding three precision rifle suppressors. I have plans to perform some more testing on different suppressors in the future. If you all would like to see a product tested feel free to ask me and I will do my best to provide you with the information.   Sound meter numbers for the Thunderbeast 30P-1  140+ for the first shot  134.7  134.6  134.9   Sound meter numbers for the Shark Suppressor 140+ for the first shot  136.2 137.0 136.0   Sound meter numbers for the Gemtech Sandstorm 140+ for the first round  134.4 137.6 136.0   When it comes to using a 30 caliber suppressor on a 223 the answer is yes. It will suppress the sound but it will not be as quiet as a dedicated 223 suppressor. It is still very effective in my opinion.    Thanks for the questions I hope they were helpful.   Juliet 1  

jrexilius
jrexilius

Was not familiar with this product.  Looks very interesting.  I to had generally believed that suppressors reduced muzzle velocity and the question was by how much.  Learning new things all the time!

jrexilius
jrexilius moderator like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

Was not familiar with this product.  Looks very interesting.  I to had generally believed that suppressors reduced muzzle velocity and the question was by how much.  Learning new things all the time!

jrexilius
jrexilius

Was not familiar with this product.  Looks very interesting.  I to had generally believed that suppressors reduced muzzle velocity and the question was by how much.  Learning new things all the time!

oletimer
oletimer

Good post. You did not mention if this can is cleanable? It must be. The look I see is it's not as well finished as some on the market. The fact that it increases velocity means it probably also has less sound suppression than others? All I actually care about is shooting without hearing protection and being quieter when hunting especially groups of hogs or dogs. What does 2800fps suppressed sound like as in 22hornet maybe? also I've been told I can use a 30cal suppressor on the 223, it just won't be as quiet as a 223 can, any experience there?

FormerSFMedic
FormerSFMedic

Fantastic write up! It's nice to see someone that really understands the technical aspects of a product in addition to the practical use of the product. Many shooters will find their abilities increasing along side an increasing knowledge. It's great that you mentioned the freebore boost. I can't tell you how many shooters I've talked to shooters that believe a suppressor will lower velocity. I think that idea stems from the MP5SD and other weapons like it, that have been purpose built with ports to lower velocity. One thing about freebore boost though, is that in reality for most precision shooters it's a drawback. When I use a suppressor, my hope is that freebore boost is at a minimum. This suppressor seems like a quality product. I tell students all the time that, with the exception of optic choice, the suppressor is the most effective accessory you can add to a precision rifle. Hell, the same could be said for most weapon systems.

oletimer
oletimer like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

Good post. You did not mention if this can is cleanable? It must be. The look I see is it's not as well finished as some on the market. The fact that it increases velocity means it probably also has less sound suppression than others? All I actually care about is shooting without hearing protection and being quieter when hunting especially groups of hogs or dogs. What does 2800fps suppressed sound like as in 22hornet maybe? also I've been told I can use a 30cal suppressor on the 223, it just won't be as quiet as a 223 can, any experience there?

oletimer
oletimer

Good post. You did not mention if this can is cleanable? It must be. The look I see is it's not as well finished as some on the market. The fact that it increases velocity means it probably also has less sound suppression than others? All I actually care about is shooting without hearing protection and being quieter when hunting especially groups of hogs or dogs. What does 2800fps suppressed sound like as in 22hornet maybe? also I've been told I can use a 30cal suppressor on the 223, it just won't be as quiet as a 223 can, any experience there?

Old PH2
Old PH2

I've put a few rounds through an old GemTech mounted on a Ruger 1022.  Very effective and absolutely saw no shift in point of aim.  Love it for culling Crows in the corn fields.

FormerSFMedic
FormerSFMedic moderator like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

Fantastic write up! It's nice to see someone that really understands the technical aspects of a product in addition to the practical use of the product. Many shooters will find their abilities increasing along side an increasing knowledge. It's great that you mentioned the freebore boost. I can't tell you how many shooters I've talked to shooters that believe a suppressor will lower velocity. I think that idea stems from the MP5SD and other weapons like it, that have been purpose built with ports to lower velocity. One thing about freebore boost though, is that in reality for most precision shooters it's a drawback. When I use a suppressor, my hope is that freebore boost is at a minimum. This suppressor seems like a quality product. I tell students all the time that, with the exception of optic choice, the suppressor is the most effective accessory you can add to a precision rifle. Hell, the same could be said for most weapon systems.

FormerSFMedic
FormerSFMedic

Fantastic write up! It's nice to see someone that really understands the technical aspects of a product in addition to the practical use of the product. Many shooters will find their abilities increasing along side an increasing knowledge. It's great that you mentioned the freebore boost. I can't tell you how many shooters I've talked to shooters that believe a suppressor will lower velocity. I think that idea stems from the MP5SD and other weapons like it, that have been purpose built with ports to lower velocity. One thing about freebore boost though, is that in reality for most precision shooters it's a drawback. When I use a suppressor, my hope is that freebore boost is at a minimum. This suppressor seems like a quality product. I tell students all the time that, with the exception of optic choice, the suppressor is the most effective accessory you can add to a precision rifle. Hell, the same could be said for most weapon systems.

Old PH2
Old PH2 moderator like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

I've put a few rounds through an old GemTech mounted on a Ruger 1022.  Very effective and absolutely saw no shift in point of aim.  Love it for culling Crows in the corn fields.

Old PH2
Old PH2

I've put a few rounds through an old GemTech mounted on a Ruger 1022.  Very effective and absolutely saw no shift in point of aim.  Love it for culling Crows in the corn fields.

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